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  • 15 Sep 2021 7:28 PM | Anonymous

    Epro Limited (Epro) has been contracted by TBfree New Zealand Limited to undertake possum control in privately owned indigenous forest and public conservation land north of Tarawera and Te Haroto Villages.

    Epro give notice of our intention to apply sodium fluoroacetate (1080) impregnated cereal pellet baits by helicopter and by hand.  We also intend to apply encapsulated potassium cyanide (Feratox) baits by hand.

    This operation will be carried out in two phases.  Initially non-toxic prefeed bait will be applied.  This will be followed five to ten days later by an application of toxic bait.  The bait will be in the form of pellets and will be dyed green in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 and the Hazardous Substances (Hazardous Property Controls) Notice 2017.

    This operation will commence as soon as practicable after 20 September 2021.

    Toxin warning signs will be erected at all normal points of entry to the area prior to toxic bait being applied.

    A fact pack is enclosed with this letter: TBfree-Aerial-Factsheet-Waipunga.pdf.  It includes a map of the area concerned and information about the operation and the toxins to be used including the precautions that should be taken.

    This information has been provided to you as a stakeholder or user organisation of affected land.  Please inform any associates, members or staff who may also use this area.  Should you require further fact packs, these are available upon request from our Taupo office.

    Please feel free to contact Epro if you require any further information.

    Yours faithfully

    Mike Reid

    Operational Controller

    Operational Controller Email Contact:  control@epro.co.nz


  • 23 Jun 2021 9:48 AM | Anonymous

    We have received a re-notification from Epro about possum control in Northern Tararuas. The notification, map and important information is included below.

    Epro Limited (Epro) has been contracted by TBfree New Zealand Limited and the Department of Conservation to undertake possum control in the Northern Tararua Ranges in the Project Kaka (Eastern) aera.

    Epro wishes to re-notify you of our intention to apply sodium fluoroacetate (1080) impregnated cereal pellet baits by helicopter and by hand. We also intend to apply encapsulated potassium cyanide (Feratox) baits by hand.

    The completion of this part of the original operation has been delayed due to unfavourable weather conditions. Previous control was implemented on 11 and 12 June 2021. The remaining Project Kaka (Eastern) operational area is described as the Waiohine River catchment being land between Tarn Ridge Hut and Dorset Ridge in the North to Kime Hut and Cone Ridge in the south. The western boundary is the Tararua main divide, and the eastern boundary runs from Mid King Bivvy to Cone Ridge.

    The bait will be in the form of pellets and will be dyed green in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 and the Hazardous Substances (Hazardous Property Controls) Notice 2017.

    This operation will commence as soon as practicable after 23 June 2021. This remains dependant on weather and operational constraints.

    Toxin warning signs will be erected at all normal points of entry to the area prior to toxic bait being applied.


  • 18 Jun 2021 9:58 AM | Anonymous

    Epro Limited has been contracted by the Department of Conservation to undertake a Tiakina Nga Manu (Battle for Our Birds) predator control project in the Erua Conservation Land, west of National Park village and Horopito.

    Epro give notice of our intention to apply sodium fluoroacetate (1080) impregnated cereal pellet baits by helicopter within the Erua Conservation Area. This may be followed by hand laying of bait containing 1080, diphacinone or potassium cyanide. This operation will commence on or after 1 July 2021, weather permitting.

    Toxin warning signs will be erected at all normal points of entry to the area prior to toxic bait being applied.


  • 22 May 2021 9:41 PM | Anonymous

    Dear Stakeholder,

    Notice of Intention to Apply Vertebrate Toxic Agents:  Orautoha GS2 and GS3

    Epro Limited has been contracted by TBfree New Zealand Limited to undertake Bovine Tb vector (possum) control on farmland at Pokaka (Orautoha GS2 and GS3).

    Epro give notice of our intention to lay diphacinone cereal pellets, sodium fluoroacetate (1080) cereal pellets and potassium cyanide (Feratox) by hand at Pokaka.  This part of the operation will commence on 1 May 2021.

    Toxin warning signs will be erected at all normal points of entry to the area prior to toxic bait being applied.

    A fact pack is enclosed with this letter.  It includes a map of the area concerned and information about the operation and the toxins to be used including the precautions that should be taken.

    This information has been provided to you as a stakeholder or user organisation of affected land.  Please inform any associates, members or staff who may also use this area.  Should you require further fact packs, these are available upon request from our Taupo office.

    Please feel free to contact Epro if you require any further information.

    Yours faithfully

    Mike Reid

    Operational Controller 

    Operational Controller Email Contact:  control@epro.co.nz

    BOVINE TB

    POSSUM CONTROL FACTSHEET

    WHY WORRY ABOUT TB?

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease, affecting New Zealand’s cattle and deer industries.  Most new herd infections are caused by infected wild animals, mainly possums, which spread the disease to farmed cattle and deer.  TBfree is a programme of OSPRI and manages the national TB control strategy, which aims to control and eventually eradicate the disease from New Zealand.

    WHY UNDERTAKE POSSUM CONTROL?

    Control operations are carried out to eliminate TB from infected possums and reduce infection rates in cattle and deer herds.  The objective of this operation is to eradicate any residual traces of TB by reducing possum numbers to low levels in order to break the disease cycle. I t is vital that we control and eventually eradicate TB from New Zealand to protect our access to high-value overseas markets for our beef, dairy and deer products.

    HOW TBFREE CONTROLS TB

    WILD ANIMAL CONTROL – To control and contain the wild animal species responsible for carrying TB and spreading the disease to cattle and deer.  Possum control work is carried out mainly using ground-based methods, such as trapping, supported by aerial control using biodegradable sodium fluoroacetate (1080) in some areas.

    DISEASE CONTROL – To control and contain the spread of the disease within cattle and deer herds through the ongoing testing and slaughter of animals suspected of having TB.

    MOVEMENT CONTROL – To control the spread of the disease between infected herds and herds in high TB risk areas, supported by herd registration and regulations, such as the correct tagging of stock.

    WHAT PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE IN MANAGING TB?

    This combination of possum control, livestock movement restrictions and effective disease management has led to a drop in infected herd numbers from 1,700 in the mid-1990s to fewer than 60 in 2017.  The long-term goal is to eradicate TB from New Zealand.  In order to achieve this, TB-infected possum numbers must be kept low.

    TBfree – RUA Orautoha GS2 Fact Sheet (Possum Ctrl)



    Toxin Fact Sheet

    Diphacinone

    Bait

    Diphacinone is an anticoagulant poison, which reduces the ability of the blood to clot and significant doses will cause internal bleeding and death.

    Diphacinone is used to target ferrets, who along with weasels and stoats belong to the mustelid family.

    Bait is a blended fish-based paste, green in colour.

    Baits are applied in tunnel bait stations, along road verges, pond margins, shelter belts, river banks, fence lines and other mustelid habitat.

    Amount of Bait to Kill

    Species

    Grams of Bait

    Number of Baits

    Ferret

    50

    0.5 to 1

    Possum

    80 to 100

    1

    Cat

    100

    1

    Dog

    200 to 500

    2 to 5

    Pig

    20,000

    200

    Poisoning Symptoms in Humans

    Nausea and vomiting may occur soon after ingestion; however, effects may be delayed for several days.

    First Aid Treatment

    Call a doctor immediately.

    Give the victim a glass or two of water and cause vomiting by putting finger down throat.

    Repeat until vomit fluid is clear in appearance.

    Oral or intramuscularly administered vitamin K is the antidote for Diphacinone poisoning.

    Poisoning Symptoms in Animals

    Laboured breathing, excitability and fluid in the lungs.

    Bleeding gums and increased tendency to bruising.

    Blood in urine and faeces and excessive bleeding from minor cuts.

    In the case of severe poisoning haemorrhagic shock, coma and death may follow.

    Cautions

    Do not handle any bait.

    Do not allow children to wander unsupervised.

    Keep all domestic animals away from tunnel bait stations.

    Poison warning notices will be erected prior to the application of Diphacinone.

    For further information, contact Epro Limited on 0800 ASK EPRO or the National Poison Information Centre on 0800 764 766.


     

    Toxin Fact Sheet

    Potassium Cyanide

    Bait

    Bait is in two forms, encapsulated potassium cyanide pellets and a paste.

    Pellets are spherical in shape and approximately three millimetres in diameter.

    Potassium cyanide will be dispensed in bait stations or stapled to trees in biodegradable bags with skull and crossbones printed on them.

    Potassium cyanide pellets have to be crushed to release the poison.

    All bait, pellets and paste, is green in colour.

    Ferapaste is the brand name for the potassium cyanide paste.  Feratox is the brand name for encapsulated potassium cyanide pellets.

    Poisoning Symptoms in Humans

    Hot flushes throughout the body, vomiting, nausea, headaches, drowsiness, dizziness, anxiety, difficulty in breathing and loss of consciousness.

    This toxin is very dangerous if swallowed, crushed in the mouth or absorbed through skin.

    If potassium cyanide comes in contact with a victim’s mouth unconsciousness can occur in ten seconds and death within minutes.

    First Aid Treatment

    Break an amyl nitrate capsule into a handkerchief and hold under patient’s nose for 30 seconds.  Repeat with further capsules every two minutes until patient stabilises.

    Remove any contaminated clothing and wash any cyanide from skin.

    Keep patient warm and call a doctor immediately.

    Poisoning Symptoms in Animals

    In animals, symptoms occur in rapid succession, including excitement and general muscle tremor.

    Animals may salivate, pass faeces and urine, gasp for breath and eventually die.

    Cautions

    Although encapsulated potassium cyanide is considered safe to handle in a bait station or biodegradable bag, time or exposure to moisture can split the outer shell of the baits releasing the potassium cyanide.

    Keep all domestic animals away from bait stations and biodegradable bags.

    Do not handle any bait.

    Do not allow children to wander unsupervised.

    Poison warning notices will be erected before application of sodium cyanide.

    For further information, contact Epro Limited on 0800 ASK EPRO or the National Poison Information Centre on 0800 764 766.


     

    TOXIN FACT SHEET

    Sodium Fluoroacetate (1080)

    Bait

    Bait comes in the form of carrot, cereal pellets, gel or paste.

    Distribution methods include aerial based (helicopter or fixed wing) and ground based methods.

    Ground methods include bait in bait stations, bait bags or applied on biodegradable cards, directly on the ground or placed in trees.

    Feed baits, used to familiarise animals with the bait type, are not toxic and are not dyed.

    Toxic baits are dyed green.

    There are no harmful effects from the smell of baits, which are often deliberately scented to attract possums.

    Amount of Bait to Kill

    Species

    Grams of Bait

    Number of Baits

    Possum

    1 to 4

    1

    Dog

    3 to 9

    1

    Man

    48 to 132

    84 to 249

    4 to 11 (pellets at 0.15%)

    7 to 20 (carrot at 0.08%)

    Poisoning Symptoms in Humans

    Nausea, vomiting, tingling and numbness in hands and face, stomach pains and anxiety.

    Muscular twitching, blurred vision and mental confusion.

    Coma, convulsions.

    First Aid Treatment

    Call a doctor immediately.

    Give water, induce vomiting until vomit fluid is clear.

    Dog Safety

    Do not take dogs into the operational area as dogs can be killed by eating 1080 baits.

    Carcasses remain toxic until completely decomposed; poison is found in the flesh and stomach content of the carcass.

    The biggest risk to dogs is from scavenging carcasses that have been poisoned by 1080.

    Dog muzzles can be purchased from Epro Limited, veterinary clinics or stock and station agents.

    Emetic pills are available from Epro Limited’s Taupo office.

    Cautions

    Do not handle any bait.

    Do not allow children to wander unsupervised.

    Keep all domestic animals out of the operational area.

    Do not take animals for eating from within the vicinity of an operational area.

    Poison warning notices will be erected prior to the application of toxic 1080 baits.

    For further information, contact Epro Limited on 0800 ASK EPRO or the National Poison Information Centre on 0800 764 766.


  • 08 May 2021 9:51 PM | Anonymous
    TAHRC website has been updated: https://tarhc.org.nz/.

     A bit on information has been uploaded for nearly all huts in the forest parks, plus a start on History and Track/Trails pages.

  • 22 Mar 2021 2:11 PM | Anonymous

    Our first NZDA Women's hunt was super successful and we want another chance in May to bring women together to support them. This time it's a bit more informal and low key but still a great chance to catch up with each other since February. Thames Valley branch are hosting this event.

    Please note: this time food will be catered.

    Attendees need to sort lunch/snacks but we will have plenty of leftovers available too. Please see attached flyer and contact Maureen as soon as you can to secure your place for May. Here is the link to our online article in Rod and Rifle magazine:

    https://rodandrifle.co.nz/articles/articles/hunting/nzda-annual-womens-hunt/

    Worth a look.


  • 12 Mar 2021 11:03 AM | Anonymous

    The hunting sector is developing a proposal for a science-based management programme for sika deer in the Kaimanawa and Kaweka Forest Parks that will benefit both hunting and conservation.

    The proposed programme is led by the Central North Island Sika Foundation with support from the Game Animal Council, NZ Deerstalkers Association, Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, the Kaweka Liaison Group and is actively engaged with the Department of Conservation. The objective is to reduce the impact of sika in areas where forest damage has been identified and to achieve a higher-quality, lower-density hunting resource that ensures beech canopy regeneration.

    “For many parts of the central North Island, where hunting has adequately managed sika densities, beech forests are regenerating following natural damage related to storms or drought. This is what we should ultimately be aiming for across the whole range,” says wildlife ecologist and science-lead for the programme, Cam Speedy.

    “The Central North Island Sika Foundation values the multi-agency approach of this project,” says Foundation President John Cook. “Effective management of our game animals is in everyone’s interest and the more we can collaborate with other organisations the better the outcome will be.”

    The programme will begin by focussing on areas where undesirable sika impact has been recorded and where the quality of the herd is showing signs of decline. It is proposed that a range of management tools be used including; improving access to remote zones for recreational hunters and encouraging them to target breeding females; employing professional ground-based hunters with indicating dogs to target hinds in priority areas; and where other methods are unsuitable, using helicopter-based aerial control of hinds.

    “Hunters want to hunt good healthy animals in a healthy environment and that requires careful management,” says Game Animal Council General Manager Tim Gale. “Deer density above the forests' ability to sustain them is bad for the ecosystem and results in poor quality hunting.”

    “The Game Animal Council supports this project as we see hunter-led management as one of the most effective means of providing long-term sustainable management of both sika and the environment.”

    NZ Deerstalkers Association CEO Gwyn Thurlow says, “NZDA is excited to be involved in this project and our volunteer members are looking forward to being part of the sika herd management story.”

    “All hunters have a role as caretakers of our game animal herds to ensure a win-win for hunting and conservation.”

    The Proposal for a Sika Research and Adaptive Management Model for Kaimanawa & Kaweka Forest Parks is available at https://nzgameanimalcouncil.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Proposal-for-a-Sika-Research-and-Adaptive-Management-Proposal.pdf.

  • 17 Sep 2019 11:35 PM | Anonymous

    On Friday the government released the proposed amendments to the Arms Act (attached below). It contains a very large number of changes and is not easy to read in the format provided. It includes the expected registration scheme, licensing of shooting clubs and ranges, marking of all firearms, 5 year licence periods, cost recovery provisions and lots more. The above will cost us all more money but cost criminals nothing.

    I understand that once the bill is introduced there will be a shortened submissions period of 3 months instead of the usual 6 months. Cynics might suggest the government and the Police want to get it through before both the election and the release of the findings of the Christchurch Royal Commission.

    The money maths is quite straightforward, 5 year licences in place of 10 and they say they want full cost recovery vs the 40% now. Club and range licensing and reporting will add to the costs, marking of firearms to some yet to be determined std is also at our cost, presumably they will want full recovery on the registration system, either at first or once they have all your data, the Canadians spent C$2B after selling it as a C$3M system and as everyone knows no government computing system ever had a cost over-run.

    This is something we all need to pay attention to and a select committee process we all need to take part in. There are none of us who will not be affected and nothing that will make the community safer, it is the triumph of dogma over reason.

    COLFO are making a stand on this and they deserve your support. 

    Arms Legislation Bill Sept 2019.pdf 

    bill-government-2019-177 -disclosure assessment.pdf 

  • 26 Feb 2019 8:09 AM | Anonymous

    Hi 

    A quick update on the Aoraki Mt Cook proposed National Park Management Plan (NPMP).

    Submissions closed 4th Feb but soon after that DoC announced that the whole plan is on hold due to a court challenge by Ngai Tahu. I believe the case concerned DoC's ability to issue concessions which would go to the core of the most contentious issues in the proposed Aoraki NPMP given they want to significantly increase helicopter landings - up to 200 per day in one area alone (70,000 per year). There was almost universal opposition to the plan from F&B, Alpine clubs, trampers and hunters. DoC get a fee for every landing but I'm sure that wouldn't influence their proposals :)

     

  • 10 Feb 2019 11:27 PM | Anonymous

    Those of you who put in a submission in June will have received notification in December of a 2nd round for submitters. Essentially the DoC regions took submissions, made their recommendations and then the national panel ignored most regional recommendations and have proposed opening virtually everything using their self written Deer Policy to usurp the previous controls put in under the Wild Animal Control Act and Conservation Act. This is wrong but they are trying to get away with it.

    The deadline for this second round is soon, 15th Feb. Hopefully most have re-submitted already but if you haven't the links below give some background on the changes proposed and a draft template submission - please re-word to suit yourself. Key things to oppose are the attempts to retain the invalid WARO openings of the Remutakas (83%) and Tararuas (18%). DoC are trying to keep them open based on the status quo despite that status being declared invalid by the high court. Akin to a thief arguing that they should keep stolen goods because they are in possession of them.

    This round is supposed to only accept submissions from those who submitted previously however DoC have added in new changes so even if you didn't submit in June feel free to preface your submissions with their new openings provide you the right to now submit. One of the new openings the national panel propose is the Kaweka Forest Park.

    Please feel free to use the draft submission emailed recently as a pick and mix list. Close off is 15th Feb.

    more info via DoC's website

    https://www.doc.govt.nz/get-involved/apply-for-permits/business-or-activity/national-wild-animal-recovery-operations/draft-land-access-recommendations-2018/

    thanks, Gordon 

     

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